Syllabuses for first-year courses

SYLLABUS FOR MATHEMATICAL METHODS I
5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master mathematical tools that are required for third-cycle studies in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics.

Content
The course covers the following topics: linear algebra, topology, calculus, and static optimization.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a written exam.

Literature
Blume, L.E. and Simon, C.P. (2010). Mathematics for Economists. WW Norton & Co.

SYLLABUS FOR MATHEMATICAL METHODS II
7.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master the essential tools for dynamic optimization that are required for third-cycle studies in microeconomics, econometrics, and especially macroeconomics.

Content
The course covers the following topics: integration, differential and difference equations, optimal control theory, and dynamic programming.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a written exam.

Literature
Sydsaeter K., Hammond P., Seierstad, A. and Strøm, A. (2008). Further Mathematics for Eco-nomic Analysis. Pearson.

Sydsaeter K., Hammond P., Strøm, A. and Carvajal, A. (2016). Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis. Pearson.

SYLLABUS FOR MACROECONOMICS I
7.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master the main workhorse models used in modern macroeconomics.

Content
The course covers all major areas of modern macroeconomics touching upon both business cycle as well as growth theory, focusing mainly on frictionless environments. It includes the following topics: the household optimization problem, the representative household model, the overlapping generation model, the neo-classical growth model, endogenous growth theory, growth and firm dynamics, and misallocation.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
Hand-in assignments during the course and a written exam at the end of the course.

Literature
Acemoglu, D. (2009). Introduction to Modern Economic Growth. Princeton University Press.
Niepelt, D. (2020). Macroeconomic Analysis. MIT Press.


SYLLABUS FOR MACROECONOMICS II
7.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to understand basic facts and be able to work with workhorse models used for research within the business-cycle, frictional labor market and incomplete-markets literature.

Content
The course covers the following topics: RBC models, New-Keynesian models, search-and-matching models of the labor market, and incomplete-market models of consumption-savings dynamics.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
Hand-in assignments during the course and a written exam at the end of the course.

Literature
Galí, J. (2015). Monetary Policy, Inflation, and the Business Cycle: An Introduction to the New Keynesian Framework and Its Applications. Princeton University Press.

Krueger, D. (2018). An Introduction to Macroeconomics with Household Heterogeneity. Un-published Manuscript.

Selected Papers.


SYLLABUS FOR MICROECONOMICS I
5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master the tools of microeconomic theory: that is, formulate social relations using the economic approach and use the tools of economic theory as a rigorous way of thinking about human decisions and their consequences.

Content
The course covers the following topics: consumer theory, producer theory, duality theory, markets, the two theorems of welfare economics, and market failures.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
Hand-in assignments during the course and a written exam at the end of the course.

Literature
Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M.D. and Green, J.R. (1995). Microeconomic Theory. Oxford Uni-versity Press.

SYLLABUS FOR MICROECONOMICS II
5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master the tools of microeconomic theory: that is, formulate social relations using the economic approach and use the tools of economic theory as a rigorous way of thinking about human decisions and their consequences.

Content
The course covers the following topics: decision making under risk and uncertainty, non-co-operative game theory including strategic form games and extensive form games, and dynamic games of incomplete information.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a written exam.

Literature
Gibbons, R. (1992). A Primer in Game Theory. Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Lecture Notes on Decision Making Under Risk and Uncertainty.

Lecture Notes on Game Theory.


Selected Papers.

SYLLABUS FOR MICROECONOMICS III
5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-11-23
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Spring term 2021

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to master the tools of microeconomic theory: that is, formulate social relations using the economic approach and use the tools of economic theory as a rigorous way of thinking about human decisions and their consequences.

Content
The course covers the following topics: economics contracts and contractual frictions.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
Hand-in assignments and a research seminar during the course and a written exam at the end of the course.

Literature
Bolton, P. and Dewatripont, M. (2005). Contract Theory. MIT Press.

Börgers, T. (2015). An Introduction to the Theory of Mechanism Design. Oxford University Press.

Laffont, J.-J. and Martimort, D. (2002). The Theory of Incentives: The Principal-Agent Model. Princeton University Press.

Salanié, B. (2005). The Economics of Contracts: A Primer. MIT Press.

SYLLABUS FOR STATISTICAL PRELIMINARIES
2.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to have obtained sufficient knowledge in probability theory and the general principles for inference to be able to understand and apply statistical methods.

Content
The course covers the following topics: probability theory and statistical inference.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a written exam.

Literature
Wasserman, L. (2013). All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical Inference. Springer.

SYLLABUS FOR TIME SERIES ANALYSIS
2.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to have obtained sufficient knowledge of the theory of stochastic processes to be able to forecast and do inference on time series data.

Content
The course covers the following topics: SARIMA models, volatility models, and state-space models.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a hand-in assignment.

Literature
Shumway, R.H. and Stoffer, D.S. (2017). Time Series Analysis and Its Applications: With R Examples. Springer.

SYLLABUS FOR ECONOMETRICS I
7.5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected understand empirically and theoretically the principles of econometrics. The student is expected to apply hypothesis testing and inference using standard econometrics tools, to understand the estimation of causal effects, and to apply to different microeconometric methods to economic questions.

Content
The course covers the following topics: asymptotic properties of ordinary least squares and instrumental variables, causal inference with the potential outcome framework, maximum likelihood, and discrete choice models (linear probability, logit and probit models).

Instruction
The course consists of lectures and TA sessions.

Assessment
Hand-in assignments during the course and a written exam at the end of the course.

Literature
Angrist, J.D. and Pischke, J.-S. (2009). Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion. Princeton University Press.

Cameron, A.C. and Trivedi, P.K. (2005). Microeconometrics: Methods and Applications. Cambridge University Press.

Wooldridge, J.M. (2010). Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. MIT Press.


SYLLABUS FOR ECONOMETRICS II
5 credits
Education cycle: Third cycle
Established: 2020-08-14
Established by: Head of department
Applied from: Fall term 2020

Learning outcomes
After completing the course, the student is expected to understand and being able to apply modern techniques for estimation of econometric models, with emphasis on estimation of causal effects. The student will become familiar with several theoretical and applied aspects of microeconometrics.

Content
The course covers the following topics: generalized method of moments and its applications, static and dynamic panel data models, nonparametric methods, clustering and bootstrap applications in micro-econometrics, and duration models.

Instruction
The course consists of lectures, TA sessions and a replication workshop.

Assessment
The course is concluded by a written exam.

Literature
Angrist, J.D. and Pischke, J.-S. (2009). Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist’s Companion. Princeton University Press.

Arellano, M. (2003). Panel Data Econometrics. Oxford University Press.

Cameron, A.C. and Trivedi, P.K. (2005). Microeconometrics: Methods and Applications. Cambridge University Press.

Wooldridge, J.M. (2010). Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. MIT Press.
Selected Papers.